NEW Trips to Take!

Myrtle's easy when the conditions are right.

 
 
 
 

NEW Plants to Try!

Louis tries to capture the exact words to describe the fleeting but deep pleasures to be found in these Summer-into-Autumn incredibles.

 
 
 
 

New Gardening to Do!

Allergic to bees? You can still have an exciting garden, full of flowers and color and wildlife.

 
 
 
 

A Gardening Journal


Today in the Garden of a Lifetime: Gold Cone Juniper, Standing Tall through the Blizzard

One definition of happiness during any blizzard? The wind and snow hasn't gotten the best of either the generator or the columnar shrubs. 

Juniperus communis Gold Cone 012715 from library 320

One hums, the other stands tall. Both are saying, "We're doing fine out here. All you frail humans just stay indoors."

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Today in the Garden of a Lifetime: Chocolate Flower-Stalks of Feather-leaf Rodgersia

Feather-leaf rodgersia is a star in Spring, when its young leaves emerge. As pointed and grasping as dragon claws, they emerge from the earth a cold, hairy, veinous purple-brown. Startling! Then—in a total change of mood—the leaves mature to the shape, size, and color of those of a horsechestnut. Harmless! Then tall creamy-white sprays of small flowers provide a fluffy show into Summer. Graceful! 

 Rodgersia-pinnata-Alba-2-012215-320

In Fall the leaves die away promptly—but the gone-to-seed flower stalks endure. Now holding countless capsules as deep and dark as single-source chocolate, the stalks are good in the garden but best in a vase. Dramatic and quirky both, they ensure that this perennial's interest holds year-round. Hallelujah!   

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Today in the Garden of a Lifetime: Arborvitae Spirals in Training

Thuja-occidentalis-Yellow-Ribbon-from-side-121715-done-320 

Winter is for pruning. Thanks to the new (twelve-foot high!) orchard ladder, the three-ball topiary of hardy orange in the background received its top-to-bottom shaping back in December. Next, the quartet of spirals of gold-leaved arborvitae. They are still young—and short—so pruning them is a matter of kneeling. Thank goodness heavy snows haven't yet arrived.

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